Michigan State Records

Michigan Inmate Records

Michigan inmate records are official identification and administrative information of individuals held in correctional facilities in Michigan. They include records identifying inmates such as their names, genders, ages, inmate numbers, and booking photos. Inmate information also include records of their offenses, incarceration, and release. Some of these records are publicly available and accessible online while others are restricted and released only to authorized parties.

Structure of the Michigan Correctional System

The Michigan Department of Corrections (MDOC) oversees the operations of the state prisons in Michigan. Its mandate also includes monitoring the probation and parole population. It currently administers 30 state prisons and a Special Alternative Incarceration (SAI) Facility. For more information about each of these facilities, follow the links provided in the Alphabetical List of Michigan Prisons.

The MDOC calls state prisons correctional facilities and classifies them in five levels according to inmate security risk and ease of managing the individuals incarcerated in these facilities. Level I prisons house inmates that pose the least risk, irrespective of their crimes, and are the easiest to manage. Level V facilities hold prisoners that pose maximum security risk and management problems.

The Special Alternative Incarcerated Facility is under the administration of the Cooper Street Correctional Facility, one of the major prisons in the Michigan Correctional System. Unlike a regular prison, the SAI facility is a military-style boot camp and a Level I facility. This prison alternative runs a 90-day regimented program for individuals sentenced to the facility. Furthermore, these individuals are referred to as trainees rather than inmates or prisoners. The SAI facility teaches self-discipline and helps trainees change their negative behaviors to socially acceptable ones and acquire and apply rewarding skills/education.

Besides state-run correctional facilities, there are also county and city jails in Michigan. County detention and correctional facilities include jails, youth facilities, boot camps, work releases, and juvenile centers/homes. Local jails and other correctional facilities in Michigan counties are usually run by sheriff’s offices. Some Michigan towns and cities also have local jails managed by their police departments.

How to Send Money to an Inmate in Michigan

The MDOC uses a fund processing vendor to accept funds on behalf of inmates in Michigan state prisons. Currently, it contracts this task to GTL Financial Services. There are four ways to send money to an inmate in a Michigan prison. These are by:

  • Money order sent to GTL lockbox
  • Credit/debit card deposit online
  • Credit/debit card deposit by phone
  • Card and cash deposit at select facilities

To send a money order to an inmate in a Michigan state prison, make the money order payable to GTL Financial Services and send it along with a completed deposit form (Spanish version) to:

GTL Financial Services
5700 SW 34th Street
Suite 1315
Gainesville, FL 32609-2835

Each money order deposit must not exceed $300 in value. GTL does not charge processing fees on money orders sent to Michigan inmates. However, it does charge processing fees for credit/debit card deposits made online at www.ConnectNetwork.com or by phone at (888) 988-4768. It also credits $1 from each transaction to the Prisoner Benefit Fund. Both fees also apply when making cash and credit/debit card deposits at GTL kiosks located in the lobbies of some of Michigan state prisons.

County/city/township jails in Michigan use different vendors for handling inmate fund deposits. Visit the local jail’s page on the municipality’s website to find out approved methods of sending money to inmates in the facility. Most of these local jails accept cash and credit/card deposits at lobby kiosks, online, and by phone. Some also allow friends and family members to send money orders and checks by mail.

How to Visit Inmates in Michigan Prisons and Jails

Before visiting an inmate in a state prison, your must be approved by the MDOC and placed on the inmate’s visiting list. Each inmate is required to complete a visiting list form identifying their immediate family members and up to 10 other individuals they want visiting them. Each of these named prospective visitors must then complete and submit a Visiting Application form along with a self-addressed stamped envelope to receive a reply notifying them of the status of their application.

Approved visitors can visit inmates during the visitation days and times for each facility. To know these details, check the MDOC’s current Visiting Schedule (Spanish Version). For future visits, check the new Visiting Schedule (Spanish) taking effect on November 14, 2019.

Before visiting an inmate in a Michigan state prison, it is also important to read the MDOC Visiting Standards (Spanish) for visitation rules and regulations.

A Michigan correctional facility may restrict all visits on short notice in the event of a communicable disease going through the prison population. In such cases, prisoners are quarantined to prevent the spread of the disease. Quarantines will last until health officers deem contact safe. MDOC will communicate sudden visitation cancellations and reinstatements on Twitter (@MichiganDOC) or on its Facebook page.

Michigan county/city/township jails have varying sets of rules and schedules for inmate visitation. To find out specific regulations and visitation times for a local jail, check online on the website of the municipality where it is located.

How to Find Inmates in Michigan State Prisons

The MDOC provides a search tool for locating inmates in the state’s prisons. This tool is the Offender Tracking Information System (OTIS). In addition to individuals incarcerated in Michigan prisons, OTIS also provide records of offenders on parole or probation supervised by the MDOC. Michigan law requires the MDOC to keep inmate records on OTIS for up to three years after their release. You can search the OTIS database by offender name, MDOC number, sex, age, race, and status.

How to Locate Inmates in Michigan County and City Jails

Each county/city/town jail in Michigan keeps its own database of inmates currently in custody and recently released. To look up an inmate in a local jail in Michigan, visit the sheriff’s office’s website (for a county jail) or police department’s website (for a city or township jail). Some municipalities have dedicated pages for sheriff’s offices or police departments on their websites. Therefore, you may visit a county website to find inmate records for a county jail or a city/town website for the records of inmates held in the city’s or town’s local jail.

Local law enforcement agencies usually provide inmate locator tools on their websites to help the public find individuals booked into local jails. Some city/county/township jails publish jail rosters that they update regularly. If an inmate lookup tool or inmate list isn’t available, find the local jail’s contact address on the city/county/township website. Alternatively, contact the sheriff’s office or police department by calling their main phone lines to enquire about inmate status and records.

Michigan State Archives

State Archives

Contact:(231) 237-2753

Results Include

Full Criminal Case Details:

  • Assault
  • Battery
  • Blackmail
  • Conspiracy
  • Domestic Violence
  • Embezzlement
  • Extortion
  • Felonies
  • Firearms
  • Fraud
  • Infractions
  • Kidnapping
  • Larceny
  • Manslaughter
  • Mayhem
  • Misdemeanors
  • Murder
  • Obstruction
  • Perjury
  • Parole Violation
  • Probation Violation
  • Robbery
  • Sexual Assault
  • Solicitation
  • Theft

Results are based upon available information from state, county and municipal databases, and may not include some or all of the above details.

Aerial view of Charles Egeler Reception & Guidance Center (RGC)

Charles Egeler Reception & Guidance Center (RGC)

  • There were over 1,240,000 reported violent crimes in the United States in 2017.
  • Between 2006 and 2010, approximately 3.4 million violent crimes went unreported.
  • Around 73 million (29.5%) of Americans have criminal records, many of which are eligible for sealing or expungement.
  • There were nearly 7.7 million property crimes in the United States in 2017. This represents a 3.6% decrease from the previous year.
  • Some newspapers have reported the cost of a public record can cost between $5 and $399,000.
  • In 2017, there were 1,920 presidential pardon requests. Of those, 142 were granted.